2017-03-16 / Cuisine

Sausage maker hopes to provide missing link at Grange


Bradley Grace works with links of sausage like those he will sell in Grace’s Fine Foods, at Grange Hall Market south of downtown West Palm Beach. 
COURTESY PHOTO Bradley Grace works with links of sausage like those he will sell in Grace’s Fine Foods, at Grange Hall Market south of downtown West Palm Beach. COURTESY PHOTO The new Grange Hall Market is set to open in the warehouse district of West Palm Beach within the next month, and a prime player there will be a butcher and food shop, Grace’s Fine Foods.

Bradley Grace, owner and a native of Dublin, Ireland, grew up in West Palm Beach, and recently moved back from Brooklyn, N.Y. There, from a “tiny, cramped basement space,” he was turning out 60-plus pounds of house-made sausage for the noted craft brew bar Rosamunde.

He’s excited about his new spot in Grange Hall, a new artisan market opening in a large warehouse south of the Kravis Center.

He and his wife, Christina, were living in Miami and saw the news about Grange Hall, and contacted Chris Vila, the market developer.

“They were looking for a concept like what I was doing. We immediately got talking — Chris and I have the same kind of vision. It’s a perfect place for Grace’s Fine Foods,” Mr. Grace said.

Up North, he had been handcrafting a variety of sausages from eco-friendly farms — he handpicked the ranchers and farmers for the products that went into the links.

“It’s something I really enjoyed doing. When I moved back down here, I found there wasn’t anywhere to find a handcrafted sausage. They caught on really quickly.”

Other chefs and private customers have sought out his sausages, and following his lead, the meats he uses.

“We’re going to do a small operation, given the space we’re working out of,” he said of Grange Hall. “It will be a kind of a full-service butcher shop. We’ll do different kinds of fresh-made sausage — at least three a day. We’ll have custom meats, sourced from small, family-owned farms, all pasture-raised, heritage breeds: beef, pork, lamb and chicken.”

Though a full-blown restaurant isn’t in the plan, a daily sandwich board will be available, and eventually, there will be more prepared foods for takeout. “We’ll have more as we grow. Stocks, soups, pickles and condiments. Pasta sauces,” he said. Fresh meats, however, will remain the focus.

While he’s met a few of the other vendors, he’s looking forward to a pre-opening party to introduce the vendors to the neighbors.

He’s happy a market like this is finally being realized in West Palm Beach. “The concept is incredible,” he said. “We haven’t seen anything like it.”

Other vendors so far include Tapitios Tacos, Steamhorse Brewery, Little Red Truck, Celis Produce, Fat Bird, Olive Oils of the World, Flower & Fringe, Rabbit Coffee Roasting Co. and others not yet finally signed.

The market is planned to open sometime in April. ¦

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